Posted in python

Executing Excel functions in Jupyter Notebooks using Mito

Mito

Data scientists often need to stratify their data using “IF” function. For instance, what is the difference of immune responses in the young and elderly after vaccination? In this case, you would filter the young by a pre-defined age cut-off (less than 65 years old). Thereafter, the data can be sorted in descending order using fold change, so as to determine the genes that are most differentially regulated. Another filtering can be used to allow identification of differentially expressed genes (DEGs), based on a pre-determined fold change and p-value cut-off. Then, another possibility may arise, where you may wonder if the dataset is influenced by gender differences, and how gender interacts with age to influence vaccine responses. This will require even more filtering of the dataset to probe into these interesting biological questions…

As you can imagine, there are many instances of filtering and comparisons to perform, especially when analysing a human dataset, due to large variations between individuals. Microsoft Excel is a useful tool to do many of these filtering and aggregation functions. However, a major disadvantage is that this consequently generates many Excel files and Excel sheets which can become difficult to manage. Python can be used to perform these filtering functions easily, but this will usually require typing of long lists of codes which can be potentially time-consuming. Hence, I recommend a python package named Mito that can accelerate execution of these filtering functions.

To install the package, execute the following command in the terminal to download the installer:

python -m pip install mitoinstaller

Ensure that you have Python 3.6 or above to utilise this package. Next, run the installer in the terminal:

python -m mitoinstaller install

Finally, launch JupyterLab and restart your Notebook Kernel:

python -m jupyter lab

To run the package in Jupyter Lab:

import mitosheet
mitosheet.sheet()

Output is as such:

The features of a mitosheet includes:

1. Import dataset
2. Export dataset
3. Add columns (you can insert formulas here)
4. Delete columns that are unnecessary
5. Pivot tables allows you to transpose and query the dataframe differently
6. Merge datasets. Possible if you have 2 excel files with a shared column.
7. Basic graph features, using Plotly
8. Filter data
9. Different excel sheets and for inserting new sheets

Most excitingly, Mito will also generate the equivalent annotated Python codes for each of these edits, meaning that you can easily use the commands to do further analysis in python. Overall, Mito is a user-friendly tool that allows you to perform excel functions within Python. This helps the workflow to be much more efficient as we do not have to import multiple excel files into Jupyter notebooks. Critically, typing of long codes is not required as the Python codes are automatically generated as you plow through the data.

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